Cheong Liew

Grilled red mullet with lemon chilli and marjoram

"I discovered red mullet when I was cooking at the Illiad restaurant back in the early 1970s. The Greeks loved this fish, simply pan-fried with lemon and garlic, and fortunately for them it was not very popular with other Australians at that time. This dish was born when a cousin visited from Toronto and I reheated this fish normally heresy and threw some Madras curry powder over it. The combination of the curry powder with the butter gives it a cross-cultural touch Asia, the Middle East and the Mediterranean all in one." From My Food by Cheong Liew"

Serves 6

Ingredients

6 small red mullet (from colder waters), filleted and deboned
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 teaspoon Madras curry powder
1 large red chilli, seeded and cut into slivers
1 bay leaf
1 large onion sliced
2 tomatoes, skinned, seeded and diced
2 lemons
150g butter, melted
2 tablespoons dry white wine (Noilly Prat)
chopped coriander
freshly dried marjoram
salt
freshly ground black pepper
In a frying-pan, seal

Method

The red mullet fillets in olive oil, skin side first then turn over to seal flesh.

Remove from the pan and set aside on a plate.

Add garlic, curry powder, chilli, bay leaf, onion and tomatoes to the same frying pan and cook gently for a few minutes without browning.

Peel the skin and membrane off the lemons. Using a sharp knife, cut down one side of the membrane between each segment and flip the segment out, removing the seeds at the same time.

Add the red mullet fillets to the frying pan, meat-side down, then arrange lemon segments over the top and brush with the melted butter.

Add wine and put frying pan under a griller to cook for 3 minutes.

Season with salt and pepper.

Arrange the fish on a platter and garnish with chopped coriander and dried marjoram. This dish can be served with a pilaf.

Grilled red mullet with lemon chilli and marjoram

Preamble
"I discovered red mullet when I was cooking at the Illiad restaurant back in the early 1970s. The Greeks loved this fish, simply pan-fried with lemon and garlic, and fortunately for them it was not very popular with other Australians at that time. This dish was born when a cousin visited from Toronto and I reheated this fish normally heresy and threw some Madras curry powder over it. The combination of the curry powder with the butter gives it a cross-cultural touch Asia, the Middle East and the Mediterranean all in one." From My Food by Cheong Liew"